Login   
  September 1, 2014   Parish PagesDaily Resources   
 
CS
Small Business Creative

Official Catholic Links


 

 
Additional Catholic Links


A critical error has occurred.
Server was unable to process request. ---> Cannot insert the value NULL into column 'BannerId', table 'smbcreative.dbo.WT_BM_Events'; column does not allow nulls. INSERT fails. The statement has been terminated

New Classifieds


Geneva, Switzerland, Aug 31, 2014 / 04:44 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The continuing spread of the Ebola outbreak in Africa is putting more lives at risk, while containment efforts and the flight of vital workers have endangered food supplies and medical care even for those without the disease.

“What we are seeing today in contrast to previous Ebola outbreaks (are) multiple hotspots within these countries, not a single remote forested area, the kind of environments in which it has been tackled in the past,” Dr. Bruce Aylward, WHO Assistant Director-General for Polio, Emergencies and Country Collaboration, told a news conference in Geneva Aug. 28.

More than 1,552 people have died and at least 3,069 people have been infected, according to U.N. figures. The outbreak is the largest ever recorded, with a fatality rate ranging from 42 to 66 percent.

The outbreak response includes efforts at providing food.

The United Nations’ World Food Program aims to feed 1.3 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The efforts plan to feed those being treated for Ebola, their relatives, and those who have been medically quarantined in an attempt to halt the spread of the disease.

Hundreds of families have lost one or more of their members, frequently one of their main income providers.

Farmers have abandoned their crops and livestock to avoid the epidemic, while authorities have also tried to ban bush meat on the grounds that bats and apes are potential carriers of the virus.

Travel restrictions have also affected the food trade, causing an increase in food prices.

Michael Stulman of Catholic Relief Services told USA Today that the rice harvest will be “seriously compromised” due to the emergency measures restricting movement.

The travel restrictions are also restricting the movement of emergency responders and emergency supplies, he added.

The outbreak is also aggravating social tensions. On Thursday riots took place in Guinea’s remote southeastern city of Nzerekore due to rumors that health workers had infected people with Ebola, Reuters reports.

The outbreak began last year in Guinea. It has spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone and now Senegal. On Aug. 29 Senegal health authorities reported the country’s first confirmed case of Ebola, which was discovered in a young man from Guinea, the Associated Press reports.

Benin, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Guinea-Bissau, and Mali may also face Ebola cases, the World Health Organization has said. A separate outbreak of Ebola infection has been confirmed in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, stressed the need for an urgent global response.

“Unfortunately, we are definitely not at the peak. It’s going to get worse before it gets better,” he told National Public Radio from Liberia on Aug. 25. “The real question is how much worse will it get? How many more people will be infected and how much more risk to the world will there be?”

Many people who need medical care for other reasons are staying away from medical centers, further endangering their health. Hospitals in Liberia are only at 10 percent occupancy, Frieden reported.

Catholic Relief Services has allocated another $376,444 to support Ebola prevention, preparedness and management activities in the affected countries, the agency announced Aug. 18. The funding will train and support community volunteers and religious leaders, support radio programs and household visits, and help provide hygiene kits.
 

read more...

Vatican City, Aug 31, 2014 / 09:39 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Christians must avoid the temptation to conform to the world, Pope Francis cautioned Aug. 31, stressing that they should instead allow their faith to transform the world around them.

“Christians live in the world, fully integrated into the social and cultural reality of our time, and rightly so,” the Pope said in his reflection at the Sunday Angelus. However, “this carries with it the risk that we might become 'worldly', that 'the salt might lose its flavor',” as the Gospel of Matthew warns.

Pope Francis spoke to those gathered in the Vatican's St. Peter's Square at noon. As he does each week, the Holy Father offered a reflection on the Sunday Gospel before reciting the Angelus.

He pointed to the passage in the Gospel of Matthew in which Jesus predicts his coming passion, death and resurrection.

At this “critical moment” in Scripture, “the apparent contrast between Jesus' way of thinking and that of the disciples emerges,” he said, pointing to Peter's rebuke of Jesus.

“Jesus, in turn, severely rebukes Peter, because he does not think 'according to God, but according to men', and plays – without realizing it – the part of Satan, the tempter.”

The Pope explained that we should learn from this example, heeding the words of St. Paul, who says, “Be not conformed to this world; but be reformed in the newness of your mind, that you may prove what is the good, and the acceptable, and the perfect will of God.”

Rather than becoming worldly, we should change the world, he said.

“When the power of the Gospel remains alive in Christians, it can transform 'mankind's criteria of judgment, determining values, points of interest, lines of thought, sources of inspiration and models of life, which are in contrast with the Word of God and the plan of salvation',” he exhorted, citing the 1975 apostolic exhortation of Pope Paul VI, Evangelii nuntiandi.

After the Angelus, Pope Francis greeted various groups of pilgrims present in the square.

Welcoming participants in an international gathering of Catholic lawmakers, he encouraged them “to live the delicate role of representatives of the people in conformity with Gospel values.”

He also noted that Monday marks a Day for the Safeguarding of Creation, sponsored by the Italian Bishops' Conference.

“The theme this year is very important - Educating to care for creation, for the health of our country and our city,” the Pope remarked.  

“I hope that it will strengthen the commitment of all institutions, associations and citizens so as to safeguard the life and health of people also respect the environment and nature.”

 

read more...

12345678

Seeing the Face of Christ in the Poor

Each Sunday, we hear St. Vincent’s name mentioned along with St. Louis and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne during the Eucharistic prayers. St. Louis we know was the King of France. We know St. Rose was a teacher and brought education to all children, especially the Native American Indians. We have heard of St. Vincent and we know he is associated with the poor and that the St. Vincent de Paul Society provides resources to those in need. St. Vincent was involved in the formation of priests and set up missionaries to go out among ordinary people and tell them about Jesus. About 150 years after his death, his missionaries came to the St. Louis area. They asked his intercession on their great mission of reaching out to the people in the wilderness of St. Louis, asking him to be our patron. 

In 1581, St. Vincent de Paul was born to poor farmers. He was the third son and learned how to tend the animals. His father thought this would be good for him, but Vincent was smart and everyone noticed. The neighbors convinced his father to send him to school and let one of his other brothers tend the animals. Therefore, Vincent went away to school. He got along very well and taught others. His teaching ability would become an asset to him and allow him many opportunities to bring others to Christ. Although, he lived almost 500 years ago, St. Vincent had a very interesting life. While making a journey by boat to a new city where he was assigned, St. Vincent was captured by pirates and sold into slavery. After years as a slave, his master decided to help him escape and chose to go with him. St. Vincent’s Christian example would lead his master to repent and return to the Catholic Church. 

The St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at the Cardinal Rigali Center

Everywhere St. Vincent lived and worked the example of his life would bring others to Christ. He was a tutor in a very rich household. He affected the parents of the children he tutored. In the 1500’s, dueling was the answer to any offense. Honor was everything. One day, the father of his students was in church praying before going off to duel. St. Vincent convinced the father that taking another’s life in a duel was cruel and God did not approve. The father amended his ways and followed the example of St. Vincent. The father and mother became St. Vincent’s greatest supporters and after the mother’s death, the father would go on to become a priest. 

This was the effect St. Vincent had on people. People would change their behaviors and amend their ways to live according to the church doctrines and follow the ways of Christ. St. Vincent had no desire to be rich or famous. Although he had influential friends, he was happy to stay working with the poor in every community. In a time when people lived extravagant lives with no regard to how the poor people lived, he would remind them of the vast differences in lifestyles. He found priests to be missionaries and formed Lady’s Charities. While volunteering for these charities, wealthier women would work alongside not so wealthy women to feed and shelter the poor. They founded hospitals and orphanages. Where there was a need, St. Vincent found ways to go to these people and meet them where they were. One day he decided to visit the prisoners who served their sentence rowing the large ships. The inhumane way in which these prisoners were treated saddened and shocked him. He appealed to the ship owners and gained permission to take care of these men. It was difficult work, but St. Vincent managed again to con-vert souls and bring more people to the Church. He said to his followers, “Love makes us see God and nothing else but God in each of those whom we love.” St. Vincent gave his life for others and taught everyone by his exam-ple. 

Each month our Pope has special intentions. He has general and missionary intentions. In September 2012, he asked God to send: “Help for the poorest Churches that Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people along with concrete resources to the poorest Churches.” On September 27, we celebrate St. Vincent de Paul’s feast day. This is an appropriate time to ask God to help the poorest. St. Vincent would approve, he once said, “By mutual support the strong will sustain the weak, and God’s work will be accomplished.” St. Vincent wants everyone to be an example of Christ in the world. To love all people as God loved us. --- Alethea Paradis, M.T.S.

 

St. Vincent de Paul's Legacy

Jesus said, “this is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” (Jn 15:12) As Christians we are called by these words of Christ to love and care for one another. The greatest way to outwardly express our love for one another is through charity- by donating our time, talent, and treasures to those in need.

There are many ways to get involved in the Catholic ministries in the Archdiocese of St. Louis that help the poor,
abused, neglected, elderly, disabled and lonely in our community, and one way is through the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. 

“Serving Christ’s needy is the first purpose of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.”

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul provides services in crisis intervention, housing, criminal justice ministry, transportation, and health.

Photo courtesy of svdpstlouis.org

Most parishes have a Society of St. Vincent de Paul conference, which are “chapters” of the Society. To find volunteer opportunities with your parish SVDP conference, you can call your parish office or look at the list of SVDP conferences.

To volunteer or donate to the Society of St. Vincent de Paul call 314.881.6000 or donate online.

 

Read more about the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.


read more...

12345

 
St. Raymond Nonnatus
8/31/2014 12:00:00 AM
Raymond became a priest due to his quiet persistence in prayer and study.   He was born to a noble Spanish family in 1204. His mother died during child birth and his father had high expectations for Raymond to serve in the country’s Royal Court.  However, the young Raymond felt drawn to religious life. In an attempt to dissuade him, his father ordered him to manage one of the family farms. However, Raymond spent his time with the workers, studying, and praying. His father finally gave up and allowed Raymond to enter the Mercederians.   Fr. Raymond spent his entire estate ransoming slaves. He even offered himself as a hostage to free another. He was sentenced to death but was spared because his ransom would bring in a large amount of money.   During his imprisonment, he succeeded at converting some of his guards. To keep him from continuing his preaching, his captors bored a hole through his lips with a hot iron, and attached a padlock. He was eventually ransomed, and he returned to Barcelona in 1239.   That year, he was named a cardinal by Pope Gregory IX.  The following year, in 1240, he was summoned to Rome, but barely made it out of Barcelona before he died at the age of 36.   St. Raymond is the patron saint of pregnant women, childbirth, and newborn infants.
read more...

First Reading - Jer 20: 7-9
8/31/2014 12:00:00 AM
7 Thou hast deceived me, O Lord, and I am deceived: thou hast been stronger than I, and thou hast prevailed. I am become a laughing-stock all the day, all scoff at me.8 For I am speaking now this long time, crying out against iniquity, and I often proclaim devastation: and the word of the Lord is made a reproach to me, and a derision all the day. 9 Then I said: I will not make mention of him, nor speak any more in his name: and there came in my heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was wearied, not being able to bear it. 
read more...

1234

 

 
Click to Advertise Now!
Small Business Creative
Unlimited ACT Preparation Classes!
CS