Login   
  August 30, 2014   Parish PagesDaily Resources   
 
CS
Click to Advertise Now!

Official Catholic Links


 

 
Additional Catholic Links


A critical error has occurred.
Server was unable to process request. ---> Cannot insert the value NULL into column 'BannerId', table 'smbcreative.dbo.WT_BM_Events'; column does not allow nulls. INSERT fails. The statement has been terminated

New Classifieds


Rome, Italy, Aug 29, 2014 / 05:02 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- A bishop of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church called for peace amid escalating conflict with pro-Russian separatists, stating that the Church there is facing increased persecution as fighting goes on.

“Even if it's not announced – it seems like a war against Ukraine,” Monsignor Dionisio Lachovicz told CNA Aug. 28. “I believe that the only hope is in the Lord, therefore we call the whole world to pray for peace.”

Msgr. Lachovicz, apostolic visitor for the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church in Italy and in Spain, explained that in the midst of rising tensions between the Ukraine and pro-Russian separatists “a new persecution is being waged against the Greek Catholics located in the territories in Russian hands.”

These are, he clarified, the areas of “Crimea and in the territories where the Russia-friendly 'separatists' are seeking to impose their power.”

In Donetsk, a large city in Eastern Ukraine, “the bishop's residence has been sacked and sealed. The cathedral's land has been struck by separatist rockets. The bishops and almost all of the Greek-Catholics priests have been forced to leave the area of Donetsk,” the bishop explained.

“The Church has been desecrated by the rebels who blackmail the clergy, threatening reprisals on the parishioners. And only some days ago the monastery of the Servants of God was occupied by separatists.”

According to BBC News, nearly 2,600 people have been killed since April, when Russia's annexation of Crimea prompted rebels to take over large parts of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions.

Heavy fighting continues near Ukraine's strategic Mariupol port, which lays off the Azov Sea. Rebel forces are currently attempting to capture the city, but Ukrainian government troops are holding ground.

Russian president Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko met Aug. 26 to discuss the ongoing crisis, shaking hands and leaving with Poroshenko’s assurance that a new “roadmap” to peace would be laid out.

However tensions skyrocketed when at least 1,000 Russian troops entered Ukraine two days later, BBC reports, prompting an Aug. 29 emergency U.N. Security Council meeting to address the situation.

“If the Russian Orthodox Church together with all of the Churches in the Ukraine joined together in the name of love in the prayer of Jesus 'that all may be one' to dialogue, then they would reach a much more realistic 'roadmap,'” Msgr. Lachovicz explained.

He lamented the fact that rather than unifying the churches after past quarrels, the current situation is being used to cause greater division, stating that during the 4th European forum for Orthodox-Catholic dialogue last June, the metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk, president of the Department for external ecclesiastical relations of the Patriarchate of Moscow, “without any documented confirmed accused the Greek Catholic Church 'in the destructive role in the Ukraine crisis.'”

Patriarch Kirill of the Russian Orthodox Church has sent a letter “to all of the heads of the Orthodox Churches and to different European political organisms with similar accusations.”

If all sides to the conflict could truly reach an agreement, they “would confirm the simple determination of Pope Francis” that “Nothing is lost with peace,” the bishop observed.

“The attention of Pope Francis to the situation in the Ukraine has always been very great and his messages and prayers, I believe, that soon they will overcome every evil that oppresses the Ukrainian land.”

Explaining how the Ukrainian people as a whole are grateful to Pope Francis, Msgr. Lachovicz also offered special thanks to Mons. Thomas E. Gullickson, apostolic nuncio in Ukraine, who's “messages and appeals are very present and concrete.”

“I would like to invite everyone to pray for peace along with the Holy Father,” the bishop said, “because to make peace requires courage, much more so than to make war.”

“Courage to say yes to encounter and no to conflict; yes to dialogue and no to violence; yes to negotiation and no to hostility, yes to the observance of pacts and no to provocations; yes to sincerity and no to duplicity.”

“This is the heartfelt appeal that Pope Francis has addressed to all the Churches of the world.”

read more...

Madrid, Spain, Aug 29, 2014 / 04:27 pm (CNA).- The appointment of Carlos Osoro Sierra as the new Archbishop of Madrid is another step forward in the renewal of the ranks of the Spanish bishops that at the same time raises expectations for Curia reform.

The Vatican announced Aug. 28 that Archbishop Osoro, who headed the Valencia archdiocese, would go to Madrid to take the place of Cardinal Antonio Rouco Varela, who resigned due to reaching the age limit for archbishops set by Church law.
 
Cardinal Antonio Canizares Llovera, who has served in the Vatican as prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship since 2008, will take Archbishop Osoro’s place as the new Archbishop of Valencia.
 
Known for his liturgical principles, Cardinal Canizares, 69, has long been rumored to be willing to return to Spain.
 
He was considered eligible for two “top positions”: that of Madrid and that of Barcelona.

Canizares would have been a difficult choice for the archbishop of Barcelona, being without Catalan origins. Madrid would have appeared to be the destination for the prefect who wished to return to Spain.
 
The Spanish bishops’ conference has already started the process of renewal. During its plenary assembly held Nov. 18-22 last year, the Spanish bishops’ conference had named its new board. Monsignor Antonio Gil y Tamayo, who served as Holy See Press Office assistant during the 2013 sede vacante period, was elected general secretary and spokesperson of the conference.
 
The Spanish bishops gathered for another plenary assembly March 11-14 and elected a new president of the conference: Archbishop Ricardo Blazquez Perez of Valladolid.
 
In that same assembly, Carlos Osoro Sierra, then-Archbishop of Valencia, was elected deputy president of the conference.
 
It was the moment when the star of Archbishop Osoro rose.
 
Ordained a priest in 1973, Osoro became Bishop of Orenese in 1997, Archbishop of Oviedo in 2002 and Archbishop of Valencia in 2009. He is now 69 years old.
 
Known for preaching about a “Church that goes out,” the archbishop is not considered a progressive. He is considered very orthodox in faith. According to a Spanish source, he will give the Archdiocese of Madrid his human touch, yet preserve the orthodoxy of its teaching.
 
In a letter sent to the Archdiocese of Madrid after his appointment was disclosed, Archbishop Osoro addressed priests, members of religious congregations, the laity and young people of his new diocese. He said he asks “the Lord to make me be at your side, according to His will that goes very much beyond any human will.”

Archbishop Osoro and Msgr. Gil y Tamayo are considered very close, and together they are called to head the renewal of the ranks of the Spanish bishops.
 
According to the Spanish daily Religion Digital, this new cycle replaces a course which has lasted for 24 years, during which Cardinal Rouco Varela of Madrid acted as a true “Spanish deputy Pope” under both Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI. Cardinal Varela had earlier advocated as his successor his auxiliary Bishop Fidel Herraéz.

One difficulty that could have arisen if Cardinal Canizares had been appointed Archbishop of Madrid is the fact that he holds no post in the Spanish Bishops Conference.
 
The Spanish bishops also felt the risk of a new “Rouco Varela case” in which one archbishop could head an influential archdiocese for many years, explained a source from within the Spanish Bishops’ Conference who spoke on condition of anonymity.

“Cardinal Canizares is 69 and had already worked in the Roman Curia. If he had been appointed in Madrid, he would have remained in that post at least until his retirement at 75, thus creating a new eventual center of power,” the source told CNA Aug. 28.
 
This is the reason that the Spanish bishops promoted the new course, backing the appointment of Archbishop Osoro to Madrid.
 
The new vacancy at the Archdiocese of Valencia allows Cardinal Canizares to return to his home diocese. He hails from Utiel, a small town in Valencia province.
 
The cardinal’s successor as prefect of Divine Worship has not been announced, which means that Pope Francis has not made the decision yet.
 
It is possible that the appointment of the new prefect will not be made soon.
 
The Congregation for the Divine Worship is one of the Vatican dicasteries that could be included in the streamlining of the Roman Curia that is now under discussion.
 
One proposal is to make a combined congregation from the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. That the proposal is being processed is indicated by the fact that Cardinal Angelo Amato, prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, has been only confirmed “ad interim” by Pope Francis, yet he has passed the age of retirement and his successor has not yet been appointed.
 
Cardinal Canizares’ successor at the Congregation for Divine Worship could be disclosed after the coming meeting of the council of cardinals advising Pope Francis. That meeting is scheduled for Sep. 15-17.
 

read more...

12345678

Seeing the Face of Christ in the Poor

Each Sunday, we hear St. Vincent’s name mentioned along with St. Louis and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne during the Eucharistic prayers. St. Louis we know was the King of France. We know St. Rose was a teacher and brought education to all children, especially the Native American Indians. We have heard of St. Vincent and we know he is associated with the poor and that the St. Vincent de Paul Society provides resources to those in need. St. Vincent was involved in the formation of priests and set up missionaries to go out among ordinary people and tell them about Jesus. About 150 years after his death, his missionaries came to the St. Louis area. They asked his intercession on their great mission of reaching out to the people in the wilderness of St. Louis, asking him to be our patron. 

In 1581, St. Vincent de Paul was born to poor farmers. He was the third son and learned how to tend the animals. His father thought this would be good for him, but Vincent was smart and everyone noticed. The neighbors convinced his father to send him to school and let one of his other brothers tend the animals. Therefore, Vincent went away to school. He got along very well and taught others. His teaching ability would become an asset to him and allow him many opportunities to bring others to Christ. Although, he lived almost 500 years ago, St. Vincent had a very interesting life. While making a journey by boat to a new city where he was assigned, St. Vincent was captured by pirates and sold into slavery. After years as a slave, his master decided to help him escape and chose to go with him. St. Vincent’s Christian example would lead his master to repent and return to the Catholic Church. 

The St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at the Cardinal Rigali Center

Everywhere St. Vincent lived and worked the example of his life would bring others to Christ. He was a tutor in a very rich household. He affected the parents of the children he tutored. In the 1500’s, dueling was the answer to any offense. Honor was everything. One day, the father of his students was in church praying before going off to duel. St. Vincent convinced the father that taking another’s life in a duel was cruel and God did not approve. The father amended his ways and followed the example of St. Vincent. The father and mother became St. Vincent’s greatest supporters and after the mother’s death, the father would go on to become a priest. 

This was the effect St. Vincent had on people. People would change their behaviors and amend their ways to live according to the church doctrines and follow the ways of Christ. St. Vincent had no desire to be rich or famous. Although he had influential friends, he was happy to stay working with the poor in every community. In a time when people lived extravagant lives with no regard to how the poor people lived, he would remind them of the vast differences in lifestyles. He found priests to be missionaries and formed Lady’s Charities. While volunteering for these charities, wealthier women would work alongside not so wealthy women to feed and shelter the poor. They founded hospitals and orphanages. Where there was a need, St. Vincent found ways to go to these people and meet them where they were. One day he decided to visit the prisoners who served their sentence rowing the large ships. The inhumane way in which these prisoners were treated saddened and shocked him. He appealed to the ship owners and gained permission to take care of these men. It was difficult work, but St. Vincent managed again to con-vert souls and bring more people to the Church. He said to his followers, “Love makes us see God and nothing else but God in each of those whom we love.” St. Vincent gave his life for others and taught everyone by his exam-ple. 

Each month our Pope has special intentions. He has general and missionary intentions. In September 2012, he asked God to send: “Help for the poorest Churches that Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people along with concrete resources to the poorest Churches.” On September 27, we celebrate St. Vincent de Paul’s feast day. This is an appropriate time to ask God to help the poorest. St. Vincent would approve, he once said, “By mutual support the strong will sustain the weak, and God’s work will be accomplished.” St. Vincent wants everyone to be an example of Christ in the world. To love all people as God loved us. --- Alethea Paradis, M.T.S.

 

St. Vincent de Paul's Legacy

Jesus said, “this is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” (Jn 15:12) As Christians we are called by these words of Christ to love and care for one another. The greatest way to outwardly express our love for one another is through charity- by donating our time, talent, and treasures to those in need.

There are many ways to get involved in the Catholic ministries in the Archdiocese of St. Louis that help the poor,
abused, neglected, elderly, disabled and lonely in our community, and one way is through the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. 

“Serving Christ’s needy is the first purpose of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.”

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul provides services in crisis intervention, housing, criminal justice ministry, transportation, and health.

Photo courtesy of svdpstlouis.org

Most parishes have a Society of St. Vincent de Paul conference, which are “chapters” of the Society. To find volunteer opportunities with your parish SVDP conference, you can call your parish office or look at the list of SVDP conferences.

To volunteer or donate to the Society of St. Vincent de Paul call 314.881.6000 or donate online.

 

Read more about the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.


read more...

12345

 
St. Jeanne Jugan
8/30/2014 12:00:00 AM
On Aug. 30, the Catholic Church celebrates Saint Jeanne Jugan, also known as Sister Mary of the Cross. During the 19th century, she founded the Little Sisters of the Poor with the goal of imitating Christ's humility through service to elderly people in need. In his homily for her canonization in October 2009, Pope Benedict XVI praised St. Jeanne as “a beacon to guide our societies� toward a renewed love for those in old age. The Pope recalled how she “lived the mystery of love� in a way that remains “ever timely while so many elderly people are suffering from numerous forms of poverty and solitude and are sometimes also abandoned by their families.� Born on Oct. 25, 1792 in a port city of the French region of Brittany, Jeanne Jugan grew up during the political and religious upheavals of the French Revolution. Four years after she was born, her father was lost at sea. Her mother struggled to provide for Jeanne and her three siblings, while also providing them secretly with religious instruction amid the anti-Catholic persecutions of the day. Jeanne worked as a shepherdess, and later as a domestic servant. At age 18, and again six years later, she declined two marriage proposals from the same man. She told her mother that God had other plans, and was calling her to “a work which is not yet founded.� At age 25, the young woman joined the Third Order of St. John Eudes, a religious association for laypersons founded during the 17th century. Jeanne worked as a nurse in the town of Saint-Servan for six years, but had to leave her position due to health troubles. Afterward she worked for 12 years as the servant of a fellow member of the third order, until the woman's death in 1835. During 1839, a year of economic hardship in Saint-Servan, Jeanne was sharing an apartment with an older woman and an orphaned young lady. It was during the winter of this year that Jeanne encountered Anne Chauvin, an elderly woman who was blind, partially paralyzed, and had no one to care for her. Jeanne carried Anne home to her apartment and took her in from that day forward, letting the woman have her bed while Jeanne slept in the attic. She soon took in two more old women in need of help, and by 1841 she had rented a room to provide housing for a dozen elderly people. The following year, she acquired an unused convent building that could house 40 of them. During the 1840s, many other young women joined Jeanne in her mission of service to the elderly poor. By begging in the streets, the foundress was able to establish four more homes for their beneficiaries by the end of the decade. By 1850, over 100 women had joined the congregation that had become known as the Little Sisters of the Poor. However, Jeanne Jugan – known in religious life as Sister Mary of the Cross – had been forced out of her leadership role by Father Auguste Le Pailleur, the priest who had been appointed superior general of the congregation. In an apparent effort to suppress her true role as foundress, the superior general ordered her into retirement and a life of obscurity for 27 years. During these years, she served the order through her prayers and by accepting the trial permitted by God. At the time of her death on Aug. 29, 1879, she was not known to have founded the order, which by then had 2,400 members serving internationally. Fr. Le Pailleur, however, was eventually investigated and disciplined, and St. Jeanne Jugan came to be acknowledged as their foundress.
read more...

First Reading - 1 Cor 1: 26-31
8/30/2014 12:00:00 AM
26 For see your vocation, brethren, that there are not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble: 27 But the foolish things of the world hath God chosen, that he may confound the wise; and the weak things of the world hath God chosen, that he may confound the strong. 28 And the base things of the world, and the things that are contemptible, hath God chosen, and things that are not, that he might bring to nought things that are: 29 That no flesh should glory in his sight. 30 But of him are you in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and justice, and sanctification, and redemption:31 That, as it is written: He that glorieth, may glory in the Lord. 
read more...

123

 

 
Unlimited ACT Preparation Classes!
Click to Advertise Now!
Small Business Creative
CS