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Washington D.C., Aug 30, 2014 / 02:35 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Pro-life advocates have strongly objected to PBS' decision broadcast the documentary “After Tiller,” saying it wrongly downplays the “gravely unjust” and deadly nature of abortion.

“When we hear PBS talk about 'humanizing' late-term abortionists, we wonder: who is 'humanizing' the viable babies these men and women kill?” Lila Rose, president of the investigative group Live Action, told CNA Aug. 29.

“Will PBS show programming in this vein, or will it just take taxpayer dollars to boost Big Abortion?”

“The abortion process is barbaric and gravely unjust at any stage, as it results in the intentional killing of an innocent, helpless human being,” she added. “But late-term abortions are particularly visually nauseating: in most procedures, abortionists will stab babies' hearts or skulls with a thick needle containing digoxin, a toxin that induces a massive heart attack.”

“Then they will let the child float, dead, in his mother's womb, and send the mother home for several days, possibly to deliver her dead child alone.”

PBS is airing the 2013 documentary as part of its POV series. The broadcaster is promoting the 2013 documentary as “a deeply humanizing and probing portrait of the only four doctors in the United States still openly performing third-trimester abortions in the wake of the 2009 assassination of Dr. George Tiller in Wichita, Kansas.”
 
The documentary will air on Labor Day and will be available on the PBS website through Oct. 1.
 
The PBS website encourages viewers to organize a “premiere party” for the documentary and provides lesson plans to guide discussions.

Rose said that hundreds of pro-life advocates have criticized the decision to air the documentary. Several have organized petitions protesting PBS’ decision to broadcast the film.

One user-submitted petition at CitizenGo.com gained more than 18,000 signatures within one day calling on PBS to cancel the showing or “give equal time to a documentary that shows third-trimester abortions from the opposite perspective.”

Rose contended that the decision to broadcast the documentary reveals PBS as “a publicly funded abortion propaganda organ – in direct violation of fundamental human rights.”

She said that Live Action investigations have uncovered “horrific abuses” in U.S. abortion facilities.

The group’s investigations send undercover journalists into abortion clinics to film how doctors and staff treat women, including those they believe to be underage girls who are seeking abortions. Some investigations have exposed late-term abortionists' willingness to let babies who survive abortions die. Other investigations have exposed abortion clinic staffers voicing a willingness to avoid mandatory reporting laws in cases of possible statutory rape.
 
“The abortion industry puts profit above all other motives, and is willing to lie, injure and kill mothers, and rampantly slaughter innocent children to keep its multi-billion-dollar enterprise afloat,” Rose said.

She charged that LeRoy Carhart, a Nebraska abortionist profiled in the documentary, left a woman to die alone during a late-term abortion procedure that lasted several days.

“She suffered complications and could not get in touch with him because he had left the state and turned off his phone,” Rose said.

Montgomery County, Maryland officials declined to press charges for the February 2013 death, which involved a New York woman 33 weeks pregnant. She died from complications in an abortion that Carhart performed. Tiller’s murder drew vocal condemnation from Catholic leaders and other pro-life advocates.

In her remarks, Rose was also clear to reject violence against those who perform abortions.

“Our goal is to change hearts and minds – even those of abortionists – and persuade all people through logic, scientific evidence, and heartfelt personal stories that all human life is precious, with inherent dignity, and deserves to be protected.”
 

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Yangon, Myanmar, Aug 30, 2014 / 07:53 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Celebrating 500 years since the arrival of Catholicism in Myanmar, Catholic artists have pooled together to evangelize through a new musical endeavor.  

Catholic Creative Artists Association – an indigenous group of Catholic professional artists inspired by Biblical experience – has composed, developed and released a music album entitled “Revelation” in honor of the anniversary.

Earlier this year, the association premiered its first mega multi-cultural musical entitled “Jesus of Nazareth” at the National Stadium for two days in front of a fully-packed audience.

The program incorporated artists from the seven major ethnic groups with their own music and dances.

“God seems to be inspiring the Church to recognize this great potential and use it for greater benefit of the Word of God,” Fr. Leo Mang, director of social communication for the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Myanmar, told CNA Aug 25.

The bishops’ conference has declared the current liturgical year “The 500th Great Jubilee Year.” Celebrations kicked off Nov. 24, 2013 and will come to close on the Solemnity of Christ the King, Nov. 23, 2014.

“It is true that the arrival of the first Catholics into Myanmar was in 1510, so in reality it is 504 years of the arrival of Catholics in Myanmar and we should have celebrated in the year 2010,” Fr. Mang said.

However, the political circumstances and religious liberty situation in the country at the time did not allow for this.

“Since the political situations in Myanmar are developing now and there are many upcoming religious freedoms in the country we feel that it is a privilege to celebrate the great Jubilee in 2014.”

Despite persecution, Catholic missionaries and the local Church in the country have worked to promote dignity and human rights in Myanmar, promoting peace, social reconciliation and interreligious dialogue.

Discussing the significance of the Catholic Creative Artists Association, Fr. Mang said, “For the first time the Church in Myanmar has performed in the National Stadium and brought to light the big potential culture and talents of Myanmar Church.”

The association’s members are top performing artists in Myanmar, with backgrounds in advertising, television and radio, he explained, adding that “their participation has added greater credibility to the performance of ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ and now in ‘Revelation,’ which is a tremendous success.”

Fr. Mang explained that the Catholic Creative Artists Association is an initiative of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Myanmar, which in 2012 decided to incorporate a group of more than 40 Catholic professional artists, including musicians, singers, actors, technicians and composers.

The bishops’ conference was responding to the call for a new evangelization by seeking to reach the hearts of people through art, the priest said.

The vision of the bishops is “to build a community of faithful Catholic artists supporting a culture of excellence among artists, encouraging them to perfect their God-given talents and flourish as craftsmen,” added Fr. Mang, “so that their work might be a more pleasing offering to God and a more effective sign of his love for mankind.”

He explained that the artists are to be “custodians of beauty” and “heralds and witnesses of hope” to all humanity.

A priest serves as chaplain for the group, coordinating and planning monthly Masses and meetings. In the future, there is hope to expand among local tribes as “a means of uniting the Catholics from different ethnic groups and strengthening the identity and faith of the Burmese people.”

Doing so, Fr. Mang said, will help respond to “the modernization process in the country (which) is alienating people from their own culture.”

In producing “Jesus of Nazareth,” members of the Catholic Creative Artists Association took many Gospel trips, walking miles to other dioceses throughout the country.

The government of Myanmar has identified seven major tribes as representatives of 137 sub- tribes and dialects, and the Catholic Church is well rooted in these ethnic cultures. The Catholic population is estimated at some 500,000, which is less than 1 percent of the total 50.5 million population in the country.
 

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Seeing the Face of Christ in the Poor

Each Sunday, we hear St. Vincent’s name mentioned along with St. Louis and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne during the Eucharistic prayers. St. Louis we know was the King of France. We know St. Rose was a teacher and brought education to all children, especially the Native American Indians. We have heard of St. Vincent and we know he is associated with the poor and that the St. Vincent de Paul Society provides resources to those in need. St. Vincent was involved in the formation of priests and set up missionaries to go out among ordinary people and tell them about Jesus. About 150 years after his death, his missionaries came to the St. Louis area. They asked his intercession on their great mission of reaching out to the people in the wilderness of St. Louis, asking him to be our patron. 

In 1581, St. Vincent de Paul was born to poor farmers. He was the third son and learned how to tend the animals. His father thought this would be good for him, but Vincent was smart and everyone noticed. The neighbors convinced his father to send him to school and let one of his other brothers tend the animals. Therefore, Vincent went away to school. He got along very well and taught others. His teaching ability would become an asset to him and allow him many opportunities to bring others to Christ. Although, he lived almost 500 years ago, St. Vincent had a very interesting life. While making a journey by boat to a new city where he was assigned, St. Vincent was captured by pirates and sold into slavery. After years as a slave, his master decided to help him escape and chose to go with him. St. Vincent’s Christian example would lead his master to repent and return to the Catholic Church. 

The St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at the Cardinal Rigali Center

Everywhere St. Vincent lived and worked the example of his life would bring others to Christ. He was a tutor in a very rich household. He affected the parents of the children he tutored. In the 1500’s, dueling was the answer to any offense. Honor was everything. One day, the father of his students was in church praying before going off to duel. St. Vincent convinced the father that taking another’s life in a duel was cruel and God did not approve. The father amended his ways and followed the example of St. Vincent. The father and mother became St. Vincent’s greatest supporters and after the mother’s death, the father would go on to become a priest. 

This was the effect St. Vincent had on people. People would change their behaviors and amend their ways to live according to the church doctrines and follow the ways of Christ. St. Vincent had no desire to be rich or famous. Although he had influential friends, he was happy to stay working with the poor in every community. In a time when people lived extravagant lives with no regard to how the poor people lived, he would remind them of the vast differences in lifestyles. He found priests to be missionaries and formed Lady’s Charities. While volunteering for these charities, wealthier women would work alongside not so wealthy women to feed and shelter the poor. They founded hospitals and orphanages. Where there was a need, St. Vincent found ways to go to these people and meet them where they were. One day he decided to visit the prisoners who served their sentence rowing the large ships. The inhumane way in which these prisoners were treated saddened and shocked him. He appealed to the ship owners and gained permission to take care of these men. It was difficult work, but St. Vincent managed again to con-vert souls and bring more people to the Church. He said to his followers, “Love makes us see God and nothing else but God in each of those whom we love.” St. Vincent gave his life for others and taught everyone by his exam-ple. 

Each month our Pope has special intentions. He has general and missionary intentions. In September 2012, he asked God to send: “Help for the poorest Churches that Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people along with concrete resources to the poorest Churches.” On September 27, we celebrate St. Vincent de Paul’s feast day. This is an appropriate time to ask God to help the poorest. St. Vincent would approve, he once said, “By mutual support the strong will sustain the weak, and God’s work will be accomplished.” St. Vincent wants everyone to be an example of Christ in the world. To love all people as God loved us. --- Alethea Paradis, M.T.S.

 

St. Vincent de Paul's Legacy

Jesus said, “this is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” (Jn 15:12) As Christians we are called by these words of Christ to love and care for one another. The greatest way to outwardly express our love for one another is through charity- by donating our time, talent, and treasures to those in need.

There are many ways to get involved in the Catholic ministries in the Archdiocese of St. Louis that help the poor,
abused, neglected, elderly, disabled and lonely in our community, and one way is through the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. 

“Serving Christ’s needy is the first purpose of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.”

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul provides services in crisis intervention, housing, criminal justice ministry, transportation, and health.

Photo courtesy of svdpstlouis.org

Most parishes have a Society of St. Vincent de Paul conference, which are “chapters” of the Society. To find volunteer opportunities with your parish SVDP conference, you can call your parish office or look at the list of SVDP conferences.

To volunteer or donate to the Society of St. Vincent de Paul call 314.881.6000 or donate online.

 

Read more about the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.


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St. Jeanne Jugan
8/30/2014 12:00:00 AM
On Aug. 30, the Catholic Church celebrates Saint Jeanne Jugan, also known as Sister Mary of the Cross. During the 19th century, she founded the Little Sisters of the Poor with the goal of imitating Christ's humility through service to elderly people in need. In his homily for her canonization in October 2009, Pope Benedict XVI praised St. Jeanne as “a beacon to guide our societies� toward a renewed love for those in old age. The Pope recalled how she “lived the mystery of love� in a way that remains “ever timely while so many elderly people are suffering from numerous forms of poverty and solitude and are sometimes also abandoned by their families.� Born on Oct. 25, 1792 in a port city of the French region of Brittany, Jeanne Jugan grew up during the political and religious upheavals of the French Revolution. Four years after she was born, her father was lost at sea. Her mother struggled to provide for Jeanne and her three siblings, while also providing them secretly with religious instruction amid the anti-Catholic persecutions of the day. Jeanne worked as a shepherdess, and later as a domestic servant. At age 18, and again six years later, she declined two marriage proposals from the same man. She told her mother that God had other plans, and was calling her to “a work which is not yet founded.� At age 25, the young woman joined the Third Order of St. John Eudes, a religious association for laypersons founded during the 17th century. Jeanne worked as a nurse in the town of Saint-Servan for six years, but had to leave her position due to health troubles. Afterward she worked for 12 years as the servant of a fellow member of the third order, until the woman's death in 1835. During 1839, a year of economic hardship in Saint-Servan, Jeanne was sharing an apartment with an older woman and an orphaned young lady. It was during the winter of this year that Jeanne encountered Anne Chauvin, an elderly woman who was blind, partially paralyzed, and had no one to care for her. Jeanne carried Anne home to her apartment and took her in from that day forward, letting the woman have her bed while Jeanne slept in the attic. She soon took in two more old women in need of help, and by 1841 she had rented a room to provide housing for a dozen elderly people. The following year, she acquired an unused convent building that could house 40 of them. During the 1840s, many other young women joined Jeanne in her mission of service to the elderly poor. By begging in the streets, the foundress was able to establish four more homes for their beneficiaries by the end of the decade. By 1850, over 100 women had joined the congregation that had become known as the Little Sisters of the Poor. However, Jeanne Jugan – known in religious life as Sister Mary of the Cross – had been forced out of her leadership role by Father Auguste Le Pailleur, the priest who had been appointed superior general of the congregation. In an apparent effort to suppress her true role as foundress, the superior general ordered her into retirement and a life of obscurity for 27 years. During these years, she served the order through her prayers and by accepting the trial permitted by God. At the time of her death on Aug. 29, 1879, she was not known to have founded the order, which by then had 2,400 members serving internationally. Fr. Le Pailleur, however, was eventually investigated and disciplined, and St. Jeanne Jugan came to be acknowledged as their foundress.
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First Reading - 1 Cor 1: 26-31
8/30/2014 12:00:00 AM
26 For see your vocation, brethren, that there are not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble: 27 But the foolish things of the world hath God chosen, that he may confound the wise; and the weak things of the world hath God chosen, that he may confound the strong. 28 And the base things of the world, and the things that are contemptible, hath God chosen, and things that are not, that he might bring to nought things that are: 29 That no flesh should glory in his sight. 30 But of him are you in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and justice, and sanctification, and redemption:31 That, as it is written: He that glorieth, may glory in the Lord. 
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