Login   
  July 23, 2014   Parish PagesDaily Resources   
 
South Side Sm
CS

Official Catholic Links


 

 
Additional Catholic Links


A critical error has occurred.
Server was unable to process request. ---> Cannot insert the value NULL into column 'BannerId', table 'smbcreative.dbo.WT_BM_Events'; column does not allow nulls. INSERT fails. The statement has been terminated

New Classifieds


Pittsburgh, Pa., Jul 23, 2014 / 05:20 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Answering the needs of refugee migrants is one component of a truly pro-life view, said a U.S. bishop, announcing a new initiative to aid children who have fled Central America for the United States.

“The Catholic Church responds to humanitarian crises here at home and all across the world because we are pro-life,” said Bishop David A. Zubik of Pittsburgh.

“Being pro-life requires we protect and care for vulnerable persons from conception to natural death,” he emphasized in a July 19 statement.

The bishop announced that Holy Family Institute, a ministry of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, in Emsworth, Pa., will be offering aid to young children fleeing Central America.

He explained that the diocese respects the law and right of nations to have secure borders and recognizes that “the root causes of why people are fleeing their homelands must be addressed by the international community.”

However, he said, the Church’s pro-life stance has implications for how the faithful are called to respond to the needy children in front of them.

“Whether they are traveling because of poverty, or violence, or with the hope of reuniting with relatives on the other side of the border, followers of Jesus are called to protect these children and help them because they are very vulnerable and defenseless against any abuse or misfortune,” Bishop Zubik said.

“You probably recall that Holy Family Institute performed a similar ministry for many Haitian children after the devastating earthquake in that country. This is exactly the same kind of humanitarian response.”

The bishop’s comments come amid heated public debate surrounding the treatment of unaccompanied child migrants to the U.S., whose numbers have doubled in the past year. Public officials disagree on how to respond to the children, many of whom are fleeing violence in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

Sister Linda Yankoski, a member of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, heads the Holy Family Institute. She explained to CNA that aiding the migrant children fits in with the sisters’ mission of charity and justice.

“We have agreed to take in the most vulnerable, the very young children under the age of 12 who make up about 20 percent of the migrating children,” she explained.

“Many of these children are fleeing violent situations and have endured a long and dangerous journey.”

The children will be provided with temporary food, clothing, housing, counseling, and recreation, Sr. Yankoski said. Eventually, they will be placed in the homes of relatives or sponsors throughout the country.  

This aid will be provided for about 30 days, until the children receive a hearing date which will determine if they fit the criteria of refugees fleeing grave danger.

In light of the “humanitarian crisis of unaccompanied children arriving at the US-Mexican border,” Holy Family Institute seeks to offer a response of “respect, care and compassion,” Sr. Yankoski said.

“It is a painful reality that poverty, greed, and selfishness often lead to injustices in the world that cause some to turn to isolationism,” she commented.

“Holy Family Institute hopes to humbly be among those looking for ways to build up the kingdom of God on earth.”

read more...

Sydney, Australia, Jul 23, 2014 / 12:03 pm (CNA).- In the wake of the crash of flight MH17 over Ukraine, Australians have been mourning the loss of the 298 persons aboard the flight, particularly their 27 nationals, one of whom was a religious sister.

Sister Philomene Tiernan was an Australian member of the Religious Sisters of the Sacred Heart, and a teacher and boarding director at Kincoppal-Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart, a girls' boarding school located in a Sydney suburb.

“We are devastated by the loss of such a wonderfully kind, wise, and compassionate woman, who was greatly loved by us all,” Hilary Johnston-Croke, principal of  Kincoppal-Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart, told CNA July 23.

She “contributed greatly to our community and she touched the lives of all of us in a very positive and meaningful way,” Johnston-Croke recounted.

Sr. Philomene, who died at the age of 77, had provided pastoral care to students both on campus and outside the school.

“We will continue to honor her wonderful legacy of love and care, of deeply influencing and touching so many of our lives and the lives of many over her long years of service,” Johnston-Croke said. “She truly lived the Cor Unum spirit.”

Kincoppal-Rose Bay, which also has a co-ed primary school, has opened counseling to its students, who have been deeply affected by this tragic loss of Sr. Philomene and the other passengers on the flight.

“Sr. Tiernan was a great soul, a supportive spiritual guide, and a friend to the students who especially felt lonely being away from home, coming from Asia-Pacific, Europe and America,” Rebecca Curran, communications manager at Kincoppal-Rose Bay, remarked to CNA.

Sr. Philomene was returning to Australia after attending a conference in Britain, a theology course in Ireland, and a retreat in France.

While in France, she had been able to visit the tomb of St. Madeleine Sophie Barat, foundress of her order, at St. Francis Xavier parish in Paris.

Cardinal George Pell, prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy and former Archbishop of Sydney, has written that "I certainly wish to pass on my thoughts and prayers and condolences to all the Sisters of the Sacred Heart, to the Kincoppal-Rose Bay School, and all the friends of Sr. Phil Tiernan tragically killed in the recent Malaysia Airlines disaster.”

"Sr. Phil will be remembered as a bright spirit and great inspiration to many not only in her school community but also throughout the Sydney Archdiocese. She will be greatly missed.”

"May the good Lord comfort truly all those who mourn this wonderful woman so dedicated in His service,” the cardinal concluded. “May she rest in peace."

Bishop Peter Comensoli, apostolic administrator of the Sydney archdiocese, said Mass July 20 in remembrance of the MH17 victims, and as a call for peace in Ukraine.

The Mass was attended by relatives and friends of the victims, as well as prime minister Tony Abbott, opposition leader Bill Shorten, and governor-general Peter Cosgrove.

Bishop Comensoli's homily reflected on the Gospel of Matthew's parable of the sower: “while everyone was asleep his enemy came, sowed darnel all among the wheat, and made off.”

“The downing of MH17 was not an innocent accident; it was the outcome of a trail of human evil,” Bishop Comensoli preached.

He said that “in the targeting and destruction of flight MH17, and the loss of 298 innocent lives, the shocking effects of our fallen humanity have once again confronted the world.”

“It is a harrowing image to see fields of crops in Eastern Ukraine strewn with human remains and wreckage, and to think of fields of wheat strewn with darnel.”

Bishop Comensoli added that “the subversion of truth is also happening in other places in the world, wherever human dignity lies blanketed under violent hatreds, ancient and new.“

“Evil will try to hide, obfuscate, deny,” he reflected. “But by the light of day the true picture will be seen. And it is under the light of the Resurrected Day, that the Risen Lord calls all of us to walk.”

Bishop Comensoli urged that all “pray for the conversion of heart of the perpetrators of this terrible evil, that they and all who are tempted to hide under the darkness of human corruption, will now walk on a path that upholds the dignity of every person.”

Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, was shot down July 17 over Ukraine near the Russian-Ukrainian border. An estimated 100 victims were HIV/AIDS delegates on their way to a conference in Melbourne.

The plane was flying over Ukraine's Donetsk region when it was shot down, and crashed. The region is home to the pro-Russian separatist organization the Donetsk People's Republic, which is rebelling against the Ukrainian government and army in the wake of earlier unrest in the region.

Fighting continues between the Ukrainian government and pro-Russian separatists; two aircraft were downed July 23 within 20 miles of the MH17 crash, according to officials in Kyiv.

Fighting in eastern Ukraine since April is believed to have led to more than 1,000 deaths.

read more...

12345678

Seeing the Face of Christ in the Poor

Each Sunday, we hear St. Vincent’s name mentioned along with St. Louis and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne during the Eucharistic prayers. St. Louis we know was the King of France. We know St. Rose was a teacher and brought education to all children, especially the Native American Indians. We have heard of St. Vincent and we know he is associated with the poor and that the St. Vincent de Paul Society provides resources to those in need. St. Vincent was involved in the formation of priests and set up missionaries to go out among ordinary people and tell them about Jesus. About 150 years after his death, his missionaries came to the St. Louis area. They asked his intercession on their great mission of reaching out to the people in the wilderness of St. Louis, asking him to be our patron. 

In 1581, St. Vincent de Paul was born to poor farmers. He was the third son and learned how to tend the animals. His father thought this would be good for him, but Vincent was smart and everyone noticed. The neighbors convinced his father to send him to school and let one of his other brothers tend the animals. Therefore, Vincent went away to school. He got along very well and taught others. His teaching ability would become an asset to him and allow him many opportunities to bring others to Christ. Although, he lived almost 500 years ago, St. Vincent had a very interesting life. While making a journey by boat to a new city where he was assigned, St. Vincent was captured by pirates and sold into slavery. After years as a slave, his master decided to help him escape and chose to go with him. St. Vincent’s Christian example would lead his master to repent and return to the Catholic Church. 

The St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at the Cardinal Rigali Center

Everywhere St. Vincent lived and worked the example of his life would bring others to Christ. He was a tutor in a very rich household. He affected the parents of the children he tutored. In the 1500’s, dueling was the answer to any offense. Honor was everything. One day, the father of his students was in church praying before going off to duel. St. Vincent convinced the father that taking another’s life in a duel was cruel and God did not approve. The father amended his ways and followed the example of St. Vincent. The father and mother became St. Vincent’s greatest supporters and after the mother’s death, the father would go on to become a priest. 

This was the effect St. Vincent had on people. People would change their behaviors and amend their ways to live according to the church doctrines and follow the ways of Christ. St. Vincent had no desire to be rich or famous. Although he had influential friends, he was happy to stay working with the poor in every community. In a time when people lived extravagant lives with no regard to how the poor people lived, he would remind them of the vast differences in lifestyles. He found priests to be missionaries and formed Lady’s Charities. While volunteering for these charities, wealthier women would work alongside not so wealthy women to feed and shelter the poor. They founded hospitals and orphanages. Where there was a need, St. Vincent found ways to go to these people and meet them where they were. One day he decided to visit the prisoners who served their sentence rowing the large ships. The inhumane way in which these prisoners were treated saddened and shocked him. He appealed to the ship owners and gained permission to take care of these men. It was difficult work, but St. Vincent managed again to con-vert souls and bring more people to the Church. He said to his followers, “Love makes us see God and nothing else but God in each of those whom we love.” St. Vincent gave his life for others and taught everyone by his exam-ple. 

Each month our Pope has special intentions. He has general and missionary intentions. In September 2012, he asked God to send: “Help for the poorest Churches that Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people along with concrete resources to the poorest Churches.” On September 27, we celebrate St. Vincent de Paul’s feast day. This is an appropriate time to ask God to help the poorest. St. Vincent would approve, he once said, “By mutual support the strong will sustain the weak, and God’s work will be accomplished.” St. Vincent wants everyone to be an example of Christ in the world. To love all people as God loved us. --- Alethea Paradis, M.T.S.

 

St. Vincent de Paul's Legacy

Jesus said, “this is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” (Jn 15:12) As Christians we are called by these words of Christ to love and care for one another. The greatest way to outwardly express our love for one another is through charity- by donating our time, talent, and treasures to those in need.

There are many ways to get involved in the Catholic ministries in the Archdiocese of St. Louis that help the poor,
abused, neglected, elderly, disabled and lonely in our community, and one way is through the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. 

“Serving Christ’s needy is the first purpose of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.”

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul provides services in crisis intervention, housing, criminal justice ministry, transportation, and health.

Photo courtesy of svdpstlouis.org

Most parishes have a Society of St. Vincent de Paul conference, which are “chapters” of the Society. To find volunteer opportunities with your parish SVDP conference, you can call your parish office or look at the list of SVDP conferences.

To volunteer or donate to the Society of St. Vincent de Paul call 314.881.6000 or donate online.

 

Read more about the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.


read more...

12345

 
St. Bridget of Sweden
7/23/2014 12:00:00 AM
Today, July 23, the Church celebrates the feast day of St. Bridget of Sweden.  Bridget received visions of Christ’s suffering many times throughout her life, and went on to found the order of the Most Holy Savior.Daughter of Birger Persson, the governor and provincial judge of Uppland, and of Ingeborg Bengtsdotter, Bridget was born in Sweden in 1303. From the time she was a child, she was greatly devoted to the passion of Jesus. When she was only ten, it is recorded that she had a vision of Jesus on the cross and heard him say, “Look at me, my daughter." "Who has treated you like this?" cried little Bridget. Jesus answered, "Those who despise me and refuse my love for them.â€�  From that moment on, Bridget tried to stop people from offending Jesus.When she was 14, Bridget married an 18-year old man named Ulf. Like Bridget, Ulf had set his heart on serving God. They had eight children, of whom one was St. Catherine of Sweden. Bridget and Ulf also served the Swedish court, Bridget as the queen's personal maid. Bridget tried to help King Magnus and Queen Blanche lead better lives, however for the most part, they did not listen to her.All her life, Bridget had marvelous visions and received special messages from God. In obedience to them, she visited many rulers and important people in the Church. She explained humbly what God expected of them. After her husband died, Bridget put away her rich clothes and lived as a poor nun. Later, in 1346, she began the order of the Most Holy Savior, also known as Bridgettines. She still kept up her own busy life, traveling about doing good everywhere she went. And through all this activity, Jesus continued to reveal many secrets to her, which she received without the least bit of pride.Shortly before she died, the saint went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the shrines there, she had visions of what Jesus had said and done in each place. All St. Bridget's revelations on the sufferings of Jesus were published after her death. St. Bridget died in Rome on July 23, 1373. She was proclaimed a saint by Pope Boniface IX in 1391."True wisdom, then, consists in works, not in great talents, which the world admires; for the wise in the world's estimation . . . are the foolish who set at naught the will of God, and know not how to control their passions." --Saint Bridget of Sweden.
read more...

First Reading - Jer 1:1, 4-10
7/23/2014 12:00:00 AM
1 The words of Jeremias the son of Helcias, of the priests that were in Anathoth, in the land of Benjamin.4 And the word of the Lord came to me, saying:5 Before I formed thee in the bowels of thy mother, I knew thee: and before thou camest forth out of the womb, I sanctified thee, and made thee a prophet unto the nations.6 And I said: Ah, ah, ah, Lord God: behold, I cannot speak, for I am a child. 7 And the Lord said to me: Say not: I am a child: for thou shalt go to all that I shall send thee: and whatsoever I shall command thee, thou shalt speak. 8 Be not afraid at their presence: for I am with thee to deliver thee, saith the Lord. 9 And the Lord put forth his hand, and touched my mouth: and the Lord said to me: Behold I have given my words in thy mouth: 10 Lo, I have set thee this day over the nations, and over the kingdoms, to root up, and pull down, and to waste, and to destroy, and to build, and to plant. 
read more...

123

 

 
Unlimited ACT Preparation Classes!
South Side Sm
Small Business Creative
Click to Advertise Now!