Login   
  April 19, 2014   Parish PagesDaily Resources   
 
Unlimited ACT Preparation Classes!
CS

Official Catholic Links


 

 
Additional Catholic Links


A critical error has occurred.
Server was unable to process request. ---> Cannot insert the value NULL into column 'BannerId', table 'smbcreative.dbo.WT_BM_Events'; column does not allow nulls. INSERT fails. The statement has been terminated

New Classifieds


Rome, Italy, Apr 18, 2014 / 02:29 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Following his celebration of the liturgy commemorating the Lord's Passion, Pope Francis led pilgrims in the traditional prayer of the Stations of the Cross, which was held inside of the Coliseum in Rome.

“I know Jesus guides us from the Cross to the resurrection,” Pope Francis said during his brief comments at the end of the meditations, adding that he “teaches us that evil does not have the final word, but love, mercy.”

“Oh Christ, help us to exclaim anew: 'Yesterday I was crucified with Christ, today I am resurrected with him; yesterday I was dead with Christ, today I am alive with him; yesterday I was buried with him, today I am resurrected with him,'” the Pope reflected.

“All together, we remember the sick,” the pontiff exhorted the crowd in his concluding remarks, “we remember all those abandoned,” and “we find in the trial of the Cross, a force of hope, of the hope of the resurrection and of the love of God.”

Beginning at 9 p.m. On Friday, the meditations for the prayer – which were written by Archbishop Giancarlo Bregantin who oversees the diocese of Campobasso-Boiano in Italy – reflected on the theme “In the suffering face of man is the profile of Christ.”

During an April 14 interview with CNA, the archbishop said that he referred to Pope Francis' example as well as the pontiff's first apostolic exhortation “Evangelii Gaudium” when writing the meditations.

“The true Way of the Cross is not what I have written, but what Pope Francis has done,” he said. “It is he who has made the Way of the Cross. I have only given words to what he writes and does. I am only a spokesman.”

“Evangelii Gaudium,” he observed is an “intense document” because in it the Pope “analyzes with clarity and gives very accurate and intense, real and courageous answers. Prophetic.”

Speaking of this year's stations, the archbishop explained that this year they have a special flavor because they represent “The Passion of Jesus which illuminates my passion.”

“It's not a sermon, a story or an exercise” he stated, clarifying that it is “immersing yourself in our pain, searching in the pain of Christ for the light that only Jesus can give to us,” and adding that “the 14 stations walk through all of the dramas of man from all times.”

“There is no pain in the world that is not fruitful. You never suffer in vain,” Archbishop Bregantin emphasized, reflecting that “to understand it each one of us has to know that he has before him the face of Jesus.”

“Because with these eyes, light and heart, it is possible to encounter in all parts of the world and in every pain and heart, a great hope.”

A centuries-old devotion, the Stations of the Cross originally began as a spiritual pilgrimage to the places marking the events of Christ's Passion and death for those who were unable to travel to the Holy Land in person, as well as for those who wished to relive their experience of going and those preparing to make the journey.

The practice of placing the “stations” of the Cross inside of churches, as well as the number of stations, 14, can be traced back at least to the 18th century.

Persons who carried the Cross during the prayer consisted of varying ages, backgrounds and states of life in the Church, and were all selected in order to illustrate the theme of suffering in Archbishop Bregantin's meditations.

During the prayer, large television screens were set up in the nearby Circo Massimo as well as on the via dei fori imperiali, which runs past the Colosseum, were put in place for participants who were unable to view what was happening inside.

Marta Jimenez contributed to this piece.

read more...

New York City, N.Y., Apr 18, 2014 / 01:59 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York blessed 30 expectant mothers and their unborn children in an April 6 Mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, offering a message of hope and love.

“I came to more fully recognize that my faith is not just for me, but also for my unborn son and for all other women struggling with faith and grace in a difficult time,” Kimberly Page told the New York-based Chiaroscuro Foundation.

“This Mass and this blessing have added so much to my life as a Catholic and how I will raise my son.”

Page said it was “redemptive” to see the Church recognize life from conception “even if conceived in circumstances that are not God's intention for the family.”

The 30 pregnant women included first-time mothers as well as women with other children.

Guests at the Mass included patients from the Gianna Center for Women’s Health, residents of Good Counsel Homes, members of the Sisters of Life and employees of the New York archdiocese’s Family Life Office.

Page said she had learned about the blessing through the Sisters of Life, who have been supporting her spiritually during her pregnancy. She said she had been “struggling with love and forgiveness” until the blessing.

Hearing her child being blessed in the womb “has helped me fully accept the grace and love that comes through Christ and his Church,” she said.

“To attend Mass as a single mother is terrifying and sometimes painful but to feel the grace and support from the sisters and from the cardinal has been invaluable,” Page said, adding that the Mass made her feel comfortable receiving Communion.

Cardinal Dolan used a prayer from the “Rite of Blessing for a Child in the Womb.” Published by the U.S. bishops in May 2012, the rite begins with a prayer for the child.

“God, author of all life, bless, we pray, this unborn child,” Cardinal Dolan prayed. “Give constant protection and grant a healthy birth.”

He said that God has brought to the pregnant woman “the wondrous joy of motherhood.”

“Grant her comfort in all anxiety and make her determined to lead her child along the ways of salvation,” he added.

read more...

12345678

Seeing the Face of Christ in the Poor

Each Sunday, we hear St. Vincent’s name mentioned along with St. Louis and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne during the Eucharistic prayers. St. Louis we know was the King of France. We know St. Rose was a teacher and brought education to all children, especially the Native American Indians. We have heard of St. Vincent and we know he is associated with the poor and that the St. Vincent de Paul Society provides resources to those in need. St. Vincent was involved in the formation of priests and set up missionaries to go out among ordinary people and tell them about Jesus. About 150 years after his death, his missionaries came to the St. Louis area. They asked his intercession on their great mission of reaching out to the people in the wilderness of St. Louis, asking him to be our patron. 

In 1581, St. Vincent de Paul was born to poor farmers. He was the third son and learned how to tend the animals. His father thought this would be good for him, but Vincent was smart and everyone noticed. The neighbors convinced his father to send him to school and let one of his other brothers tend the animals. Therefore, Vincent went away to school. He got along very well and taught others. His teaching ability would become an asset to him and allow him many opportunities to bring others to Christ. Although, he lived almost 500 years ago, St. Vincent had a very interesting life. While making a journey by boat to a new city where he was assigned, St. Vincent was captured by pirates and sold into slavery. After years as a slave, his master decided to help him escape and chose to go with him. St. Vincent’s Christian example would lead his master to repent and return to the Catholic Church. 

The St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at the Cardinal Rigali Center

Everywhere St. Vincent lived and worked the example of his life would bring others to Christ. He was a tutor in a very rich household. He affected the parents of the children he tutored. In the 1500’s, dueling was the answer to any offense. Honor was everything. One day, the father of his students was in church praying before going off to duel. St. Vincent convinced the father that taking another’s life in a duel was cruel and God did not approve. The father amended his ways and followed the example of St. Vincent. The father and mother became St. Vincent’s greatest supporters and after the mother’s death, the father would go on to become a priest. 

This was the effect St. Vincent had on people. People would change their behaviors and amend their ways to live according to the church doctrines and follow the ways of Christ. St. Vincent had no desire to be rich or famous. Although he had influential friends, he was happy to stay working with the poor in every community. In a time when people lived extravagant lives with no regard to how the poor people lived, he would remind them of the vast differences in lifestyles. He found priests to be missionaries and formed Lady’s Charities. While volunteering for these charities, wealthier women would work alongside not so wealthy women to feed and shelter the poor. They founded hospitals and orphanages. Where there was a need, St. Vincent found ways to go to these people and meet them where they were. One day he decided to visit the prisoners who served their sentence rowing the large ships. The inhumane way in which these prisoners were treated saddened and shocked him. He appealed to the ship owners and gained permission to take care of these men. It was difficult work, but St. Vincent managed again to con-vert souls and bring more people to the Church. He said to his followers, “Love makes us see God and nothing else but God in each of those whom we love.” St. Vincent gave his life for others and taught everyone by his exam-ple. 

Each month our Pope has special intentions. He has general and missionary intentions. In September 2012, he asked God to send: “Help for the poorest Churches that Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people along with concrete resources to the poorest Churches.” On September 27, we celebrate St. Vincent de Paul’s feast day. This is an appropriate time to ask God to help the poorest. St. Vincent would approve, he once said, “By mutual support the strong will sustain the weak, and God’s work will be accomplished.” St. Vincent wants everyone to be an example of Christ in the world. To love all people as God loved us. --- Alethea Paradis, M.T.S.

 

St. Vincent de Paul's Legacy

Jesus said, “this is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” (Jn 15:12) As Christians we are called by these words of Christ to love and care for one another. The greatest way to outwardly express our love for one another is through charity- by donating our time, talent, and treasures to those in need.

There are many ways to get involved in the Catholic ministries in the Archdiocese of St. Louis that help the poor,
abused, neglected, elderly, disabled and lonely in our community, and one way is through the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. 

“Serving Christ’s needy is the first purpose of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.”

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul provides services in crisis intervention, housing, criminal justice ministry, transportation, and health.

Photo courtesy of svdpstlouis.org

Most parishes have a Society of St. Vincent de Paul conference, which are “chapters” of the Society. To find volunteer opportunities with your parish SVDP conference, you can call your parish office or look at the list of SVDP conferences.

To volunteer or donate to the Society of St. Vincent de Paul call 314.881.6000 or donate online.

 

Read more about the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.


read more...

12345

 
Blessed James Oldo
4/19/2014 12:00:00 AM
James Oldo experienced a radical conversion that led him to become a Franciscan tertiary, and later a priest. He was born in 1364 into a rich family in Lodi, Italy. He married at a young age, and he and his wife both led a very self-indulgent lifesyle. One day, a traveling reproduction of the Holy Sepulchre came to thier town. As a joke, James lay down on it to compare his height to Christ's. As soon as he laid down on it, he was instantly converted, and became a tertiary soon after. At first, his mother and wife were opposed to the change they saw in him, but soon they grew attracted to his new ways and became tertiaries as well. The family turned their mansion into a chapel and worked with the sick and with prisoners. When James’ wife died, he became a priest. His acts of penance were so severe that his bishop had to order him to eat at least three times a week. He was a celebrated preacher, who inspired many to enter the religious life. He also prophesied wars and his own death. He died at the age of 40 in 1404. When his body was moved seven years after his death, it was found incorrupt.
read more...

First Reading - Gen 1:1-2:2
4/19/2014 12:00:00 AM
[1] In the beginning God created heaven, and earth. [2] And the earth was void and empty, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God moved over the waters. [3] And God said: Be light made. And light was made. [4] And God saw the light that it was good; and he divided the light from the darkness. [5] And he called the light Day, and the darkness Night; and there was evening and morning one day.[6] And God said: Let there be a firmament made amidst the waters: and let it divide the waters from the waters. [7] And God made a firmament, and divided the waters that were under the firmament, from those that were above the firmament, and it was so. [8] And God called the firmament, Heaven; and the evening and morning were the second day. [9] God also said: Let the waters that are under the heaven, be gathered together into one place: and let the dry land appear. And it was so done. [10] And God called the dry land, Earth; and the gathering together of the waters, he called Seas. And God saw that it was good.[11] And he said: Let the earth bring forth the green herb, and such as may seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after its kind, which may have seed in itself upon the earth. And it was so done. [12] And the earth brought forth the green herb, and such as yieldeth seed according to its kind, and the tree that beareth fruit, having seed each one according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. [13] And the evening and the morning were the third day. [14] And God said: Let there be lights made in the firmament of heaven, to divide the day and the night, and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days and years: [15] To shine in the firmament of heaven, and to give light upon the earth. And it was so done.[16] And God made two great lights: a greater light to rule the day; and a lesser light to rule the night: and the stars. [17] And he set them in the firmament of heaven to shine upon the earth. [18] And to rule the day and the night, and to divide the light and the darkness. And God saw that it was good. [19] And the evening and morning were the fourth day. [20] God also said: Let the waters bring forth the creeping creature having life, and the fowl that may fly over the earth under the firmament of heaven.[21] And God created the great whales, and every living and moving creature, which the waters brought forth, according to their kinds, and every winged fowl according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. [22] And he blessed them, saying: Increase and multiply, and fill the waters of the sea: and let the birds be multiplied upon the earth. [23] And the evening and morning were the fifth day. [24] And God said: Let the earth bring forth the living creature in its kind, cattle and creeping things, and beasts of the earth, according to their kinds. And it was so done. [25] And God made the beasts of the earth according to their kinds, and cattle, and every thing that creepeth on the earth after its kind. And God saw that it was good.[26] And he said: Let us make man to our image and likeness: and let him have dominion over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and the beasts, and the whole earth, and every creeping creature that moveth upon the earth. [27] And God created man to his own image: to the image of God he created him: male and female he created them. [28] And God blessed them, saying: Increase and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it, and rule over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and all living creatures that move upon the earth. [29] And God said: Behold I have given you every herb bearing seed upon the earth, and all trees that have in themselves seed of their own kind, to be your meat: [30] And to all beasts of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to all that move upon the earth, and wherein there is life, that they may have to feed upon. And it was so done.[31] And God saw all the things that he had made, and they were very good. And the evening and morning were the sixth day.[1] So the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the furniture of them. [2] And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made: and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had done.
read more...

123

 

 
CS
Unlimited ACT Preparation Classes!
Click to Advertise Now!
Small Business Creative